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2011 William Morris Events in the United States


Saturday, 15 January, 11.30 a.m.

Pre-Raphaelite Lens Exhibition: Special Morris Society Tour
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

Members and friends are invited to a special tour with the exhibition’s curator, Diane Waggoner. Join us for lunch after. The Pre-Raphaelite Lens: British Photography and Painting, 1848–1875 is the first survey of British art photography focusing on the 1850s and 1860s.

With 100 photographs and 20 paintings and watercolors the exhibition examines the roles photography and Pre-Raphaelite art played in changing concepts of vision and truth in representation. Photography’s ability to quickly translate the material world into an image challenged painters to find alternate versions of realism. Photographers, in turn, looked to Pre-Raphaelite subject matter and visual strategies in order to legitimize photography’s status as a fine art.

Lewis Carroll, Julia Margaret Cameron, Roger Fenton, Oscar Gustave Rejlander, and many lesser known photographers had much in common with such painters as John Everett Millais, William Holman Hunt, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and John William Inchbold, who all wrestled with the question of how to observe and represent the natural world and the human face and figure.

This rich dialogue is examined in thematic sections on landscape, portraiture, literary and historical narratives, and modern-life subjects.

Diane Waggoner is associate curator in the department of photographs at the National Gallery of Art. She received a PhD in art history from Yale University. Prior to joining the department, she held positions at the Yale University Art Gallery and at the Huntington Library, where she was the curator of The Beauty of Life: William Morris and the Art of Design (2003). Since joining the NGA, she has co-curated many exhibitions. Her co-authored catalogue for The Art of the American Snapshot was the 2008 winner of the College Art Association’s Alfred H. Barr, Jr., Award for distinguished museum publication. A specialist in the nineteenth century, she has also published on the photographs of Lewis Carroll.

Meet at entrance to the East Building, National Gallery of Art, Fourth St. NW, Washington, DC.

Tuesday, 1 March
Due date for Call for Papers MLA 2012: “Pre-Raphaelite Audiences: Artists, Critics, Readers"
Papers are sought for a second proposed 2012 session on “Pre-Raphaelite Audiences: Artists, Critics, Readers,” co-sponsored by the William Morris Society in the United States and SHARP (Society for the History of Authorship, Readers and Publishing). Abstracts or proposals (250 words maximum) should be sent by 1 March 2011 to Florence Boos at florence-boos@uiowa.edu and Gregory Barnhisel at barnhiselg@duq.edu.


Exhibitions

Through 2 January
Gustav Stickley and the American Arts and Crafts Movement
Newark Museum, Newark, NJ
Gustav Stickley and the American Arts and Crafts Movement offers the first comprehensive examination of the life and work of the recognized patriarch of the American Arts and Crafts movement. The exhibition explores Stickley as a business leader and design proselytizer, whose body of work included furnishings, architectural and interior designs, and the Craftsman magazine, which became synonymous with the Arts and Crafts movement at the turn of the twentieth century. This exhibition includes more than 100 masterworks produced by Stickley's designers and workshops: furniture, textiles, metalwork and lamps, as well as drawings. From Stickley's earliest progressive furniture of 1900 to designs created around the time of his ill- fated expansion of 1913, the exhibition provides a perspective on the aesthetics, craftsmanship, and identity of the works of Stickley's Craftsman Workshops and their role in creating the ideal home of the era.
www.newarkmuseum.org.

Through 30 January
The Ideal Book: William Morris and the Kelmscott Press
Grosvenor Rare Book Room of the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library, Buffalo, NY
William Morris, inspired by medieval illuminated manuscripts and the great German and Italian books of the 15th century, initiated the revival of modern fine printing in 1891 with his Kelmscott Press. View many of the works of the Kelmscott Press, including the renowned Chaucer, as well as a selection of books from those influenced in some way by Morris such as the Roycroft, Doves, Vale, Ashendene, and Essex House Presses. Learn more about the history of the Kelmscott Press, the life of William Morris, important individuals like Edward Burne-Jones and Emery Walker and the profound impact of William Morris on the theories of book design in the 20th century. Information, including precise dates, will be posted on the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library web site. Free and open to the public.
www.buffalolib.org

Through 30 January
The Pre-Raphaelite Lens: British Photography and Painting, 1848–1875
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
In the first survey of British art photography in the 1850s and 1860s, some 130 photographs, paintings, and watercolors chronicle photography's relationship with Pre-Raphaelite art and its consequent role in changing concepts of vision and truth in representation. Photography's ability to quickly translate the visual world into an image challenged painters to find alternate versions of realism. Photographers, in turn, looked to Pre-Raphaelite subject matter and visual strategies in order to legitimate photography's status as a fine art. As the exhibition will show, Lewis Carroll, Julia Margaret Cameron, Roger Fenton, H. P. Robinson, O. G. Rejlander, and many lesser known photographers had much in common with such painters as John Everett Millais, William Holman Hunt, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and John William Inchbold, as all wrestled with the question of how to observe and represent the natural world and the human face and figure. This rich dialogue between photography and painting is examined in the exhibition's thematic sections on landscape, portraiture, literary and historical narratives, and modern life subjects. Curator: Diane Waggoner, assistant curator, department of photographs, National Gallery of Art.
www.nga.gov

Through 30 March 2012
Arts & Crafts Moments: Simplicity in Design
T.C. Steele State Historic Site, Nashville, IN
T. C. Steele State Historic Site in Brown County, Indiana, allows you to step back in time and witness a revolutionary period in art history through the Steeles' lives and their deliberate design choices. The exhibition, highlighting artifacts and architecture from the Arts & Crafts Movement, runs from 2 November 2010 through 30 March 2012. The T.C. Steele home, garden and art studio is famous for its rich history, picturesque surrounds and unique artistic and intellectual atmosphere, just west of Nashville, Indiana in the heart of artistic Brown County. It is here that nature's beauty meets the artist's canvas. www.indianamuseum.org

Until 15 May
The Arts and Crafts Movement in the Pacific Northwest
Whatcom Museum at the Lightcatcher, Bellingham, WA
Organized by the Museum of History and Industry, Seattle, this major new exhibition brings to light exceptional work from the Arts and Crafts movement in the Northwest during the early twentieth century. The exhibition showcases significant buildings and interiors, furniture, glass, metalwork, ceramics, textiles, graphics and book arts, and photography with over one hundred objects drawn from public and private collections.www.seattlehistory.org

Through 31 August
Chinamania: Whistler and the Victorian Craze for Blue-and-White
Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Blue-and-white Chinese porcelain became a hot item in London in the 1870s, a craze the British press mockingly dubbed "Chinamania." James McNeill Whistler, an early collector of Chinese porcelain, helped stimulate this fad by depicting such wares in his paintings. The Chinamania exhibition at the Freer explores Chinese porcelain in Whistler's England, where it was first valued as aesthetic inspiration but soon proliferated as a commodity. Featured are twenty-three works of art: blue-and-white porcelain objects from the Peacock Room; eight wash drawings of Kangxi porcelain that Whistler produced for a collector’s catalogue; and paintings, pastels, and etchings inspired by the artist’s interest in porcelain. Also on view: Freer and Whistler, about the painter's most important patron, and, of course, the famous Peacock Room.
www.asia.si.edu

August 26 - October 14, 2011
William Morris and the Art of the Book
From the collection of Jack Walsdorf, author of On Collecting William Morris: A Memoir — Collins Memorial Library, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma WA


Talks, Lectures, and Conferences

6–9 January

2011 Modern Language Association Annual Convention
Los Angeles, CA: William Morris Society Activities

After many years of holding its annual meetings in December, the Modern Language Association will meet next on 6–9 January 2011 in Los Angeles. According to new MLA guidelines, Allied Organizations such as the William Morris Society are granted one guaranteed session and may apply for a second collaborative one. Accordingly, in 2011 the Morris Society is sponsoring one session and co-sponsoring a second with the Arthurian Society of America. We have also arranged to apply for a second 2012 session in association with SHARP, the Society for the History of Authors, Reading and Publishing.

Thursday, 6 January

81. "William Morris and the Arts: Architecture, Crafts, Design"
1.45–3 p.m., Olympic 3, J. W. Marriott
Program arranged by the William Morris Society
Presiding: Kathleen O'Neil Sims, independent scholar
"Morris's Hands," Sue A. Zemka, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder
"William Morris and the SPAB (Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings): From the Nineteenth Century to the Present," Andrea Donovan, Minot State Univ.
" "The Art of the Kelmscott Chaucer," Stephanie Amsel, Univ. of Texas, San Antonio

Friday, 7 January

310. "The Pre-Raphaelites and the Medieval Past"
1.45–3 p.m., Diamond Salon 6, J. W. Marriott
Program arranged by the William Morris Society and the Discussion Group on Arthurian Literature
Presiding: Florence S. Boos, Univ. of Iowa
"Rossetti's Rose: Elizabeth Siddal and The Romance of the Rose," Kathleen R. Slaugh-Sanford, Univ. of Delaware
"'Among the Cursed Jues': Edward Burne-Jones and 'The Prioress's Tale,'" Rachael Zeleny, Univ. of Delaware
"Translating Medieval Images in Beardsley's Le Morte Darthur," William Nelles, Univ. of Massachusetts, Dartmouth

Friday, 7 January

Group dinner arranged by the Society.
For time and location contact Florence Boos.

 

Saturday, 22 January, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

Truth to Nature: British Photography and Pre-Raphaelitism
East Building Concourse, Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
Sympoisum with illustrated lectures by noted scholars including David Coleman, Duncan Forbes, Laura Henrickson, Andrew Szegedy-Maszak, and Malcolm Warner. Free and open to the public.
For more details download the symposium announcement [pdf].
www.nga.gov

Saturday, 15 April

Symposium for Emerging Scholars
Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms, Morris Plains, NJ
Last October, the Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms (located in Morris Plains, NJ) kicked off a year-long celebration of the 100th anniversary of Stickley's Log House. Of the various special events planned for 2011, the most interesting are a “Symposium for Emerging Scholars,” announced for 15 April, and a celebratory weekend scheduled for October. Organized in partnership with the American Fine and Decorative Art Program at Sotheby’s Institute of Art, the "Symposium for Emerging Scholars" will be dedicated to the work of up-and-coming scholars working on the Arts and Crafts movement. For a copy of the Call for Papers or additional program details, please contact the museum at (973) 540-0311. Although program information for the October "Symposium and Gala Weekend" is not yet available, the three-day event is expected to include a tour and opening reception, a full-day symposium on the theme of "Living the Arts and Crafts Lifestyle 2011," and a black tie evening party. More information will be found in due course on the Stickley Museum website.
www.stickleymuseum.org

Thursday, September 29, 2011 — 4:00 pm

"Searching for a Famous Book: A Census of the Kelmscott Chaucer"
A presentation by William S. and Sylvia Holton Peterson
The Library of Congress — The Lessing J. Rosenwald Room (LJ205)
The Rare Book and Special Collections Division — 2nd Floor, Jefferson Building
Co-sponsored by the American Printing History Association, Chesapeake Chapter, and the William Morris Society in the United States.
For further information, please contact The Division at 202-707-2025
ADA@loc.gov